What are the Labour Market Outcomes for Immigrants Planning to Work in Regulated and Unregulated Occupations

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Link: http://www.yorku.ca/tiedi/doc/AnalyticalReport5.pdf
By: Steven Tufts, Maryse Lemoine, Mai Phan, Philip Kelly, Lucia Lo, Valerie Preston, John Shields
Org: Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI)

This report sought to answer the question: What is the labour market performance, in terms of participation rate, unemployment rate, full-time employment, hourly wage, annual income, days of jobless spells, and appropriateness of work for immigrants planning to work in regulated and unregulated occupations?

Background

Access to regulated occupations is restricted under provincial regulations. The need for accreditation creates major barriers to the full utilization of immigrants' skills. Such obstacles result in foreign trained immigrants facing more difficulties integrating into the Canadian labour market.

The intention to work in a regulated or unregulated occupation before arrival is only one of many factors that might contribute to labour market outcomes. It is also worth bearing in mind that the data presented here represent only a very specific cohort of immigrants – arriving in a narrow window of time and within a particular set of macro-economic circumstances. Furthermore, intended occupation does not guarantee that immigrants end up working in that occupation. Difficulties with accreditation or integrating into the labour market, changing interest and circumstances may all influence immigrants’ trajectories following immigration.

Conclusions

Only tentative conclusions can be reached from the data compiled in this report. But, they are:

  • Immigrants planning to work in regulated occupations were more likely to have found work related to their studies or training 4 years after arrival (but the data do not tell us if such work was actually in a regulated occupation or just related to it);
  • Gender and intention to work in regulated or unregulated occupation influence average hourly wages;
  • There were no significant patterns connecting the intention to work in a regulated or unregulated occupation with labour participation, unemployment rates, jobless days, average months taken to find first job, and annual household income;
  • Half of immigrant women planning to work in unregulated occupations did not work in their field of study 4 years after arrival, a proportion much lower than other groups;
  • Immigrant women were more likely to have lower participation rate, lower full-time status, take more time to find their first job, experience longer jobless spells, and have lower hourly wages than immigrant men, regardless of whether they were planning to work in regulated or unregulated occupations.

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