Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN)

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Link: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/index.php


The Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN) is a network of academic researchers interested in strengthening our understanding of the Canadian labour market. In April 2006 CLSRN was established as a partnership between academic researchers and Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSD), which provides funding for research and related activities of the network.. National in scope, the CLSRN consists of established scholars and promising new researchers, and includes scholars from the fields of economics, industrial relations, political science, sociology, business, history, policy studies and labour studies.

Immigrants are part of HRSDC's Policy Research and Survey Plan, which is reflected in the CLSRN's Working Papers Series. According to the HRSDC Research Plan (PDF) section Inclusion of Immigrants, Aboriginal peoples, the Homeless, and Other Vulnerable Groups:

  • "Why do we care about the economic inclusion of immigrants, Aboriginal peoples, the homeless, and other vulnerable groups?

As stated earlier, the vision for the department is one of a Canada where every Canadian has the opportunity to develop and contribute to society and the economy by participating in learning and the workplace. Therefore, barriers of any kind preventing anyone from working or adding to their skills must be addressed. This vision goes further, though, than just the elimination of barriers. It also includes cultivating an environment where people can help themselves, i.e. an efficient labour market that sends accurate signals to participants on jobs available and the skills required for the jobs.

Basically, we care because the Canadian economy does not realize its full productive capability when people do not participate in the labour market to the full extent of their abilities. All Canadians have not shared equally in the benefits from the economy’s strong growth over the last decade. Recent immigrants, Aboriginal peoples, and the homeless fell further behind other Canadians over this period."

Immigrants and Labour Market - Related Research

Recent immigrant-related CLSRN working papers include (all links are to PDF documents):

CLSRN Working Paper no. 25

Abstract Résumé
Temporary Foreign Workers and Former International Students as a Source of Permanent Immigration?
Arthur Sweetman (Queen's University)
Casey Warman (Queen's University)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 21

Abstract Résumé
The Economic Return on New Immigrants? Human Capital: the Impact of Occupational Matching?
Gustave Goldmann (Statistics Canada)
Arthur Sweetman (Queen's University)
Casey Warman (Queen's University)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 19

Abstract Résumé
The Pursuit of Post-Secondary Education: A Comparison of First Nations, African, Asian and European Canadian Youth?
Victor Thiessen (Atlantic Research Data Centre; Dalhousie University)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 18

Abstract Résumé
The Evaluation of Immigrants? Credentials: The Roles of Accreditation, Immigrant Race, and Evaluator Biases?
Joerg Dietz (University of Western Ontario)
Victoria M. Esses (University of Western Ontario)
Chetan Joshi (University of Western Ontario)
Caroline Bennett-AbuAyyash (University of Western Ontario)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 13

Abstract Résumé
Immigrant Earnings Distributions and Earnings Mobility in Canada: Evidence for the 1982 Landing Cohort from IMDB Micro Data?
Michael Abbott (Queen's University)
Charles M. Beach (Queen's University)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 11

Abstract Résumé
Determinants and Effects of Post-Migration Education Among New Immigrants in Canada?
Rupa Banerjee (Ryerson University)
Anil Verma (University of Toronto)
Executive Summary

CLSRN Working Paper no. 5

Abstract Résumé
The Role of Social Ties in the Job Search of Recent Immigrants?
Deepti Goel (Boston University)
Kevin Lang (Boston University; NBER)
Executive Summary